Landscape Architect & Specifier News

AUG 2013

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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Above, Left Custom granite benches are etched with the "14" Street designator. The custom colored linear concrete unit pavers are set on sand to infiltrate stormwater into the tree vaults (see images on p. 42 for more details). Above, Middle and Bottom, Left and Right The 45-foot-tall "urban toy" concrete tower in bright primary colors at 14th and Curtis streets stands across from a 13 x 62-ft. long yellow diamond aluminum wall and cantilevered bench, a combined art piece from the husband-and-wife team of Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt (R & R Studios) of Miami. The colorful sculpture depicts stacked oversized children's blocks that spell "All Together Now," which was completed in 2007 and priced at $250,000. The playful block tower is in keeping with other nearby urban art: Argent's giant blue bear on 14th Street, and Donald Lipski's sculpture of a toy horse on a red chair outside the Denver Central Library. 44 Landscape Architect and Specifier News Bike Friendly, Too Denver B-cycle was the first large-scale municipal bike sharing system in the U.S. The city boasts 80-miles of multiuse trails, 96 miles of bike lanes, 41 miles of "sharrows" and 400 miles of signed bike routes. In that spirit, 14th Street added a dedicated bike lane that connects Cherry Creek trail and Civic Center Park, and new bike racks (Madrax). The successful achievement of all the project's goals is unprecedented in Denver's history of streetscape design. The improvements have transformed 14th Street into Denver's destination "Ambassador Street," welcoming visitors to the downtown area with an enhanced pedestrian experience, improved livability, and new opportunities for economic vitality. The project elevates the urban fabric of downtown Denver to a national scale, raises the investment in the public realm to new heights, and establishes higher expectations for anticipated streetscape and landscape architectural projects.

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