Landscape Architect & Specifier News

AUG 2013

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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/ th 28 st 31 Avenue Connector Landscape Architecture by Hawkins Partners, Inc. Nashville Metro Public Works developed the 28th/31st Avenue Connector as a highly visible, sustainable "complete street," meaning the design not only accommodates vehicles and transit, but pedestrians and cyclists within a limited right-ofway, plus "green street" stormwater management. The 28th/31st Avenue Connector project is a new 0.3-mile roadway that includes a railroad overpass. It reunites the North Nashville and West Nashville communities that were disconnected by the development of the interstate highway system in the 1960s. One of the most important aspects of the project was the social reconnection of the two communities through active participation in planning workshops and meetings. Neighbors worked side-by-side to create the "quilt patterns" represented in the public art now on the bridge. Nashville Metro Public Works developed the project as a highly visible, sustainable "complete street," meaning the design not only accommodates vehicles and transit, but pedestrians and cyclists within a limited right-of-way, while also allowing 70 Landscape Architect and Specifier News "green street" stormwater management. This complete street concept provides safe usage for each transportation group. Bicyclists are accommodated with the first protected, separated bike lane for the city of Nashville. The bike path along each side of the road used an integral colored concrete surface to distinguish it from the adjacent pedestrian sidewalk. Solar LED lane pavement markers further delineate the bike lane. The roadway design narrowed the street to 11-foot lanes, versus the standard 12-ft. width, affording landscaped medians for much of the route, thereby reducing the amount of impervious surface. Accommodations for transit riders along the corridor are artist designed transit stops. The new transit route, called the "University Connector," does just that: connects to higher education institutions along the route. (Continued on page 72)

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