Landscape Architect & Specifier News

AUG 2014

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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August 2014 45 including photo-realistic simulations, were prepared for two public and numerous design committee meetings. HAAS Landscape Architects (HLA) was the lead throughout the design effort and shared the responsibilities for public information sessions. HLA provided design development, construction documentation, submittal reviews and limited construction support services. Also considered within the context of the project were Complete Streets policies, sustainable stormwater initiatives and more amenities. HLA lobbied strong for the use of natural materials, including clay brick, granite and steel, since the entire project was located within the Court Street Historic District. Maintenance needs were reviewed with the Binghamton City Parks staff to ensure the sustainability of the plantings, pavements and site amenities. Project Challenges The Association of Vision Rehabilitation and Employment (AVRE) and the Independence Center had a strong voice in requesting safe street crossings and clear pedestrian zones. Form, function and the clear definition of edges became major design objectives for these improvements, including curbed planters and heavy steel traffic bollards with double chains. The decision to incorporate a traffic roundabout was not made without criticism. To win over the community, case studies were carefully researched and the public was informed of the safety benefits, Top, Right Cast iron tree grates with 5' x 5' and 4' x 6' profiles (Neenah R-8713, R-8811) were added to extend the site's existing design theme and improve pedestrian safety. Total tree plantings and varieties of species were tripled on Court Street by the renovation, and add welcomed shade outside new student housing. Sidewalk planting beds were raised 20 to 30 inches to avoid underground vaults and utilities. Above, Right Well-defined crosswalks provide strong contrast and easy access across 11-foot travel lanes, and widened sidewalks accommodate café seating and local performers. Round glass fiber reinforced concrete planters (Highland Products, Aurora series) were added throughout the streetscape for additional visual interest.

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