Landscape Architect & Specifier News

JAN 2016

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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(Continued from page 16) h a rd s c a p e s Top Approximately 24,000 cubic feet (covering more than 38,000 square feet) of Coldspring's prairie brown granite in two different finishes are used for numerous features throughout the Cincinnati Riverfront project, including stairways (treads and risers), paving, seatwalls, benches, drainage runnels, facing, coping, curbing, interactive fountain features, map features, carved benches, wall panels and a bicycle ramp. PHOTO CREDIT: PATRICK MCCUE PHOTOGRAPHY Middle & Bottom Using repurposed material from a granite quarry as an artistic element can help keep costs down while creating exceptional appeal. At the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, three granite pieces unusable for manufacturing purposes were used to create artistic landscape elements that complement the sculpture in the plaza outside the new Biomedical Discovery District, Cancer and Cardiovascular Research Building. ARTIST AND PHOTO CREDIT: MARIA ARTEMIS 18 Landscape Architect and Specifier News Q: How is granite used for the Smale Riverfront Park? Kron: In designing the Smale Riverfront Park, granite was the material of choice for many of the features. When designing for the riverfront area, which is located in a floodplain, designers had to consider the Ohio River's inevitable flooding; granite's durability was a key factor. It was chosen specifically for areas where damage from flooding and de-icing is a threat. So far, prairie brown colored granite from our Millbank, S.D., deposit has been used to form stairways (treads and risers), paving, seatwalls, benches, drainage runnels, facing, coping, curbing, interactive fountain features, map features, carved benches, wall panels, and a bicycle ramp. The finishes include "Diamond 10," a smoother finish, and "Rock Pitch," a rougher finish. Q: There's a lot of talk today about sustainabil- ity. How does sustainability fit into an urban redevelopment's goals for hardscapes? Kron: Because sustainable design is now a high priority for many landscape architects, granite's small footprint is extremely appealing. For a sustainability- minded design team, granite should be at the forefront of materials in consideration for urban hardscapes due to the aesthetics and long life cycle. And when the hardscape is eventually remodeled, the stone can be reused for the next phase or repurposed for an entirely new project. In some instances the (Continued on page 86)

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