Landscape Architect & Specifier News

JAN 2016

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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January 2016 45 But whatever was built on the Olmsted area is as close as possible to the drawings and concepts Esarey found in the Olmsteds' archived documents. For instance, Esarey found sketches of a gazebo in the archives, and a gazebo was built within the Olmsted area. While it is new, it is also patterned after the Olmsteds' concepts. Esarey found several references to a "turf panel," essentially a patch of lawn area. "The Olmsted garden design was a series of garden rooms, as is the updated plan," he said. "The turf panel garden room is open lawn." So he had a similar turf panel installed within the Olmsted five-acre designated site. An iris and peony garden room was put in next to the turf panel, and the formal garden sits nearby. However, since a central fountain no longer existed, a new fountain was obtained from Authentic Provence, West Palm Beach, Fla. It is a standard piece the company sells, Esarey said, and came complete with a base. "The central fountain is flanked on each side by hidden garden rooms that surprise visitors." John Charles Olmsted and Frederick Law Olmsted Jr. were sons of the eminent landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. In 1898, the brothers inherited the very first landscape architecture firm in the nation from their father. The Olmsted brothers were among the founding members of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), and played major roles in the creation of the National Park Service. The brothers have completed numerous high- profile projects, and many of them remain popular even now. In 1938, the residence was a country home, Esarey said. But in 2012, the home was renovated as a Above Tucked away in the woods is a "gem" that at first glance appears to be a small pond, Esarey said. It is actually the recirculation basin that helps clean the water for the slate quarry. It has flagstone edging, bubbling water and vegetation.

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