Landscape Architect & Specifier News

FEB 2016

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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62 Landscape Architect and Specifier News front wall. Five colors were used to emulate the shades of water from the light colored shallow areas of the surrounding waterways to the darker depths." The 4,800 sq. ft. pool features offers two conventional stairways at the ends of the pool to enter the water, plus an an accessible "beach entry" at the pool's midpoint. One stairway leads to the lap swimming area, while the other leads to the lounging pool area. All fountain, pool and spa copings have the same 5-color tile blend in single rows, versus multiple rows on the waterfall walls. "Along the western edge of the pool deck we again stepped the grade down 2ft. to a +7' level, using the architect's same shade pavilion as employed at the upper level deck to protect the lower level heated spa from the warm westerly sun," explains the landscape architect. The swimming pool empties into a lower level trough that incorporates a vanishing edge detail with the leading wall covered with the same 5-color tile blend as on the water feature wall. Sitting in the spa one gets a multidimensional perspective of the pool's waterfall edge and the upper deck fountains, bridge and covered walkway, all centered in the overall design. Employing the same color pavers as those used in front, the landscape architect created curving bands of 9 pavers wide, progressively colored with the 'malt 2', than the 'malt 2/buff', followed by the 'tan/sienna' combination. These colored bands were repeated as often as necessary. This same color scheme continues on the upper level living decks, so when viewed from the 28-story tower units, becomes an intertwined, serpentine graphic painting. The flowing curves are evident in every aspect of the hard surface design, beginning with the shade structure columns that sit on curved precast concrete platforms on the upper level of the fountain. The aluminum railing for the bridge crossing also features a curvilinear design, while still complying with the 4" on center picket design required for level changes. The water feature, curbed water trough, planters, beach entry railing, pool and spa designs also follow the same curvilinear pattern described by the pavers. Top & Bottom, Right The hardscape for the pool deck, as for the driveway and parking spaces, incorporates a 'uni-décor' design pattern of octagonal and square pavers in buff, tan malt and sienna color combinations. Flowing curves are evident in every aspect of the hard surface design, beginning with the round, shade structure columns that sit on curved precast concrete platforms on the upper level of the fountain. The water wall for the curving infinity pools is colorfully tiled with five tile colors (Daltile), beginning with 'Oyster' white, transitioning to light blue 'Alapulco', then progressing to darker hues of blue: 'Cancun', 'Ocean' and 'Kahiea. The grout is a 'Blueberry' hue. The fountain, pool and spa copings incorporate the same 5-color tile blend, but as single rows versus the multiple rows on the waterfall walls. Note: The landscape architect had the aluminum railing painted in white and blue shades to match the pool tiles. The rail arches mimic waves, and had to be spaced no more than 4" apart to comply with safety requirements for drops over 3 feet. The client opted to have the railing repainted all white for a more understated look. Above The multicolor pavers integrate subtle differences between the lighter colored sidewalk and darker roadway. The sidewalk border is a 'malt' hue, while the sidewalk infill is a 'malt 2/buff'. The ongrade parking also employs a uni-décor design of pavers (octagonal pavers with smaller square pavers in between) with 'tan/ sienna' borders and an infill that is 60% 'malt 2/buff' and 40% 'tan/sienna', with complementary colored curbing. (Continued on page 64)

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