Landscape Architect & Specifier News

APR 2017

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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50 Landscape Architect and Specifier News Continued on page 52 In the fall of 2016, the homeowners approached McKay about converting their lighting system to LED. Andrew Coleman, an outdoor lighting designer for the company who goes by "AJ," met with the homeowners to discuss the benefits of retrofitting with LEDs, what fixtures would convert to LED lamps, versus replaced or upgraded, and adding light to dark areas. The house is on two lots in a gated community, and has a large area to cover. Similar to a small arboretum, the property has a variety of tree species and plants. The original 2000 lighting installation included only one fixture per tree. The tree canopy includes sugar and red maples, bur oaks, Colorado blue spruces, a Japanese lilac and serviceberry trees. The trees had about tripled in size from the original lighting installation. AJ saw that the single fixtures no longer adequately illuminated the trees, and so recommended two fixtures for most of the trees to get the canopies well illuminated. All of the in-ground Nightscaping 'Leveliter' well lights were replaced with new Auroralight Copper Spots (SLX16) with Halco LED MR-16 lamps, and were repositioned under the trees to for the best effect. The 120-volt can lights on the corners of the home left the home's three roof peaks dark. Auroralight Copper Spots (AL16) along the front of the home helped illuminate those rooflines. The original spot lamps were converted to Halco LED MR-16 lamps. Above: All the in-ground Nightscaping 'Leveliter' well lights were replaced with Auroralight copper spots (SLX16) with Halco LED MR-16 lamps, and were repositioned under the trees for the best effect. From left: crabapple (blue spruce behind), sugar maple, red maple and a large bur oak. Right: A 4-watt LED illuminates the home address. The transformer was upgraded to a stainless steel Vista 300 MT with a digital astronomical timer to replace the old analog timer. 50 Landscape Architect and Specifier News

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