Landscape Architect & Specifier News

AUG 2017

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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64 Landscape Architect and Specifier News The Academy Street design was focused on accommodating downtown festivals. The new wide sidewalks, public seating and overall layout facilitate a positive experience for attendees. Enhanced electrical infrastructure, buried utilities and the addition of high-voltage outlets along the street support the needs of bands, vendors and food trucks. Customized materials on Academy Street support the design in creating a sense of place. The granite benches, which pay homage to the area's music history, are composed of North Carolina granite with varying polished and flame finishes. 'Scarborough' style metal benches and 'Parc Centre' bistro tables and chairs offer a variety of fixed and mobile seating along the streetscape, providing visitors with options to relax and enjoy the atmosphere. Landscaping is accented in multiple ways. Some of the large existing trees (and temporary art) are uplit; there are also LED tree string lights and 'Camellia' patterned tree grates. Duke Energy provided the Continued on page 66 Academy Continued from page 62 Left: The sidewalk hardscape includes Pine Hall brick and Hanover 12"x12" pedestrian pavers. Hanover 4"x8" pavers were also incorporated on the street. Japanese maples are in the large concrete planters. Above: Enhanced electrical infrastructure, buried utilities and the addition of high-voltage outlets along the street support the needs of bands, vendors and food trucks for festival events. "Outdoor rooms" are at the core of the reimagined streetscape concept and provide environments for groups to gather and enjoy the active downtown scene. pedestrian-scale LED street lighting. Alternative modes of transportation, such as biking, are promoted by the inclusion of custom bike racks with a dogwood flower motif. New pavers for the sidewalk and roadway bring a complementary aesthetic. The sidewalk hardscape includes Pine Hall brick and Hanover 12"x12" pedestrian pavers. Hanover 4"x8" pavers were also incorporated on the street, including lane markings with pavers in yellow and white. There are also solar accent pavers that charge during the day and glow all night. The project was successful largely due to extensive community involvement. When redesigning and constructing a streetscape, the potential is always there for negative impacts on businesses and residents, particularly with street closings, detours and slower traffic. By facilitating extensive stakeholder involvement, the team was able to keep the public up-to-date on all project phases. Today, there is a sense of positive energy brought on by the new streetscape. Since completion, the downtown area is flourishing, with local shops reporting an increase in business and foot traffic.

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