Landscape Architect & Specifier News

SEP 2017

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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50 Landscape Architect and Specifier News vantage points, tactile creatures and spiral slides down to the lower playground. The waterfall and interactive water feature are reminiscent of the surrounding red rock and slot canyons located around southern Utah. The design intent surrounding this feature was to allow those with mobility challenges to access and experience the incredible detail and scale associated with these iconic Utah landscapes. Local sculptor/contractor Dreamweaver Specialties created the faux rockwork associated with the water feature and volcano, which includes a multitude of intricate detailed carvings of dinosaurs and realistic sandstone rock formations. Sunset Pools, a premier local pool contractor, donated a large portion of the material and labor for the impressive multilevel waterfall and water feature. The water feature includes a grotto like cave that can be accessed from two sides. Children can go behind the waterfall and venture out into a shallow wading area. There is also a meandering stream that leads to a dramatic fossil—an impressive dinosaur skull protruding from a large rock outcropping. The water feature is surrounded by abundant landscaping and is accessible by wheelchair. The park offers a quarter scale wheel chair accessible C.P. Huntington train manufactured by Chance Rides. The train circumnavigates the park along a 2,700-foot rail line loop and passes through several tunnels along its route. On its journey, the train passes behind the upper level of the waterfall through a sandstone tunnel, exposing riders to a microclimate created by shade and water mist. The train is modeled after one used in the historic golden spike ceremony that is significant to Utah's heritage. Editor's note: The May 10, 1869 ceremony to drive the last stake that joined the Union and Central Pacific Railroads at Promontory Summit, Utah, signified the completion of the U.S. transcontinental railroad. There is even a large themed depot with a ticket booth and loading platform located in the park, which serves as a multiuse shade structure when the train isn't running. The train is operated by local volunteers and city staff and has been quite the popular park element. The design team wanted to encourage community ownership and involvement in the project's development, so significant artwork and murals were incorporated into the park design and experience. Much of the artwork and mural mosaics were developed in cooperation with Left: The waterfall and interactive water feature are reminiscent of the surrounding red rock and slot canyons of southern Utah. Water construction specialists created the faux rockwork for the water feature and volcano, which includes a multitude of intricate detailed carvings of dinosaurs and realistic sandstone rock formations. Sunset Pools, a premier local pool contractor, donated a large portion of the material and labor for the impressive multilevel waterfall and water feature. Top Left: A grotto-like cave, accessible from two sides, allows children to go behind the waterfall and venture into a shallow wading pool. There is also a meandering stream that leads to a dramatic dinosaur skull fossil protruding from a prominent rock outcropping.

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