Landscape Architect & Specifier News

SEP 2018

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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September 2018 55 use. New paint, chain link, and stretched invisible mesh panels give it a feeling of openness and embrace the plantings from adjacent areas. Outdoor woven shade cloth is stretched over the chain link sidewalls to block views of neighboring apartment buildings. The pattern is changed when the cloth needs to be replaced. The new play area that runs along the classroom building, now released to the sky by the partial cage removal, was transformed into a park-like playground designed to foster pretend play and imagination at the youngest of ages. Zinc planters surrounding the play zones are filled with a variety of native shrubs and trees - many chosen for their edible, fragrant, or tactile properties. Blueberries, which students are allowed to pick and eat freely, grow sporadically around the play area. Lesson plans were created to understand the plant qualities and growing habits, and an initial study was performed to ensure that no poisonous plants were included, as the children are encouraged to touch and experiment with the plants. A wire mesh wall along the roof perimeter allows vines to creep up and sunlight to shine through while following code requirements and keeping the students safe as they play and explore. A series of playground structures were installed amongst the greenery that cater to different age groups Top: In the middle of a concrete jungle, the expansive ball play area is designed to emulate field and sky. The dark green padded mats recall evergreen hedges, and the green poured rubber flooring resembles a grassy ball field that allows for soccer matches, basketball games, four square, hopscotch, and free-play. PHOTO: FRANK OUDEMAN / OTTO Above: With the addition of the 120-square-foot living wall, which features more than 10 species of low light and understory plants, the length of the garden room has become one of the more iconic and beloved elements within the whole play deck. PHOTO: FRANK OUDEMAN / OTTO

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