Landscape Architect & Specifier News

JUL 2014

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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12 Landscape Architect and Specifier News c o m m e n t a r y John 7:38 … Whoever believes in me, as the Scripture has said, 'Out of his heart will flow rivers of living water.'" George Schmok Publisher/Editor-in-Chief gschmok@landscapeonline.com Stephen Kelly Editor skelly@landscapeonline.com Michelle Medaris Education mmedaris@landscapeonline.com Kyle Cavaness Economic News kcavaness@landscapeonline.com Larry Shield Product Editor lshield@landscapeonline.com Michelle Mabanta Editorial Administrative Assistant mmabanta@landscapeonline.com Associate Editors Ashley Calabria Associate Editor/Digital Information University of Georgia calabria@uga.edu Buck Abbey, ASLA Associate Editor: Ordinances Green Laws Org. lsugreenlaws@aol.com Russ Adsit, FASLA Associate Editor/Erosion Executive Director, IECA russ@ieca.org Janet Lennox Moyer, IALD Associate Editor/Lighting moyerj@rpi.edu (In Memoriam) Don Roberts, FASLA Kay Tiller Frank Manwarren David Brian Linstrum Lois E. Schmok Otto Edward Schmok Art Director Nicole Miller nmiller@landscapeonline.com Graphic Designer Matthew Medeiros mmedeiros@landscapeonline.com Ad Coordinator Oliver Calonzo ocalonzo@landscapeonline.com Circulation / Fulfillment Edward Cook ecook@landscapeonline.com Likkien Ralpho lralpho@landscapeonline.com Ana Linares alinares@landscapeonline.com Aaron Schmok aschmok@landscapeonline.com IT Department Web / Tech Manager Jerry Short jshort@landscapeonline.com Web / Graphics Assistant Sam Roe sroe@landscapeonline.com Chief Operations Officer C.O.O. Mark O'Halloran mohalloran@landscapeonline.com Sales Administration Cynthia McCarthy cmccarthy@landscapeonline.com Advertising/Marketing 714-979-LASN (5276) x113 • 714-979-3543 (Fax) Print Advertising Sales Vince Chavira vchavira@landscapeonline.com Matt Henderson mhenderson@landscapeonline.com Kip Ongstad kongstad@landscapeonline.com Trade Show Sales Jared Lutz jlutz@landscapeonline.com Sales Assistant Nathan Schmok nschmok@landscapeonline.com Event Production Amy Deane adeane@landscapeonline.com Inventory/Fullfilments Javier Miranda jmiranda@landscapeonline.com Tiffany Schmok tschmok@landscapeonline.com Welcome to the July Water Features issue! In this issue you will find several spectacular projects, from the largest private development in the United States, to a single man-made cloud floating over a small park in the city of steel. Hopefully you will notice that LASN has also upgraded to brighter paper stock, making the water glisten even more . . . You know . . . Living in Southern California in the midst of a severe drought, it is as m(i)stifying to see the water leaping into the air and rolling down the falls as it is frustrating to know that these projects would never be acceptable in our dry part of the world. Most cities are built on or around rivers, or at least around great bodies of fresh water, but L.A., the second largest city in the U.S., is built on the edge of a desert, fed by rivers more than 200 miles away. So when we lined up the article submissions for the water features issue, all we could do was shake our heads and wonder what it would be like to live in a water rich part of the country. When we talk about water in the landscape in Southern California, the conversations center around using less, wasting none and wishing we had more. (That conversation will be the main topic of the upcoming "Green" issue due out this November.) Sure, the project in west Texas — "Making a Splash in Big Spring" (p. 48) — is one of those, "Are you sure we should do it?" kind of projects, especially given that Big Springs is named after the main water source in the area . . . a 14' deep pond, fed by a small natural spring. My mentor, Donald Milton Roberts FASLA, once said that the first option for a project is to not build it, and we all know that water conservation is a big issue in the big state of Texas. But considering that the city's official website has two big banners on it, the top one advertising the 'Family Aquatic Center' water park, and the other reminding citizens to remember their 'water restriction days', it's hard to tell if they are truly concerned about water there or not. In any event, it's just as hard to deny the project is spectacular and knowing how they do things in Texas . . . It was going to be built . . . That aside and for now, though, sit back and revel in the wondrous world of flowing, glowing and blowing water . . . And who knows . . . Maybe the predicted El Niño will bring all the water we need to the southwest, and we can start to build projects like these everywhere . . . Ok . . . Maybe not. But a guy can dream . . . Right? - God bless Okay to Play ... Just Not to Spray! George Schmok, Publisher Find Us Online: @LandscapeComm @landscapeonline @LandscapeOnline.com

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