Landscape Architect & Specifier News

JUL 2014

LASN is a photographically oriented, professional journal featuring topics of concern and state-of-the-art projects designed or influenced by registered Landscape Architects.

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July 2014 41 300 native trout, more than 600 trees and hundreds of native plants. The creek divides the lower level, so bridges were added every 60 feet and the width of the pedestrian street was narrowed to about 35 feet to accommodate cross-mall shopping. Two waterfalls flank the creek, each more than 18 feet high. The falls flows over large, local quarried boulders. Leading down to the mall plaza are three rectangular fountains. At the plaza level are three circular fountains. The client desired fountains with fire and water elements that could be programmed with music for entertaining City Creek Center patrons. WET Design of Sun Valley, Calif., was brought in to design just such an experience. Known perhaps best known for the Bellagio fountains in Las Vegas, WET Design created three circular fountains: 'Flutter,' Transcend' and 'Engage.' Flutter integrates "dancing fire on sheets of water" that spill out in the shapes of bells; Transcend provides musically choreographed displays, spewing fire and streams of water upward in playful patterns. Engage invites children to interact with its animations. Fountain consultants CMS Collaborative contributed designs for the series of three rectangular fountains in the mall leading to the central plaza. The fountains complement the large existing water feature at the nearby LDS Conference Center. SWA Group, San Francisco, provided conceptual design and design development for all of City Creek Center's outdoor environments. For durability, permanence and ability to reflect the area's natural landscape, granite provided the ideal choice. Landscape architect SWA Group, CMS Collaborative, and Top one water effect for 'Transcend' is WET's "bloom nozzles," which create columns of water that open like flowers to better refract sunlight. The computer-controlled fountains took about four years to design and construct. Underground tanks of compressed air help create the water effects. PhoTo: WET

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